LATEST NEWS & INFO

Computer science trainings for educators coming to Ohio

Image of students coding

In 2013, the non-profit Code.org launched with a simple vision: “every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science.” Now, the organization provides trainings, a library of course content, and political advocacy.

To expand access in Ohio, Code.org has selected Battelle Education as a Professional Learning Partner. That means Battelle Education, manager of the Ohio STEM Learning Network, will be organizing more trainings around computer science and coding.

Code.org is underwriting much of the cost, allowing teachers to attend at no or a reduced cost. The key requirement: Any school seeking training must be able to teach computer science as a standalone course in Fall 2016.

The first opportunity is a free summer training on high school Advanced Placement Computer Science with support for travel. For this training, the teacher must teach one or more class in  Advanced Placement Computer Science next school year. Teachers in schools that already have a partnership with Code.org can apply here. If your school doesn’t have a partnership, but you can commit to teach computer science next year, sign up on Code.org’s waitlist.

Finally, if you’d just like to stay informed, sign up to hear more about computer science in Ohio and read the full release from Battelle below.

Code.org taps Battelle Education as Professional Learning Partner

National computer science group sought partner to expand reach

COLUMBUS, Ohio (April 13, 2016)—Battelle Education has been named a Professional Learning Partner for national computer science non-profit Code.org. Through the partnership, Battelle Education will facilitate computer science training for Central Ohio educators.

Computer science helps build logic and problem-solving skills in students. Code.org’s financial support and library of resources will provide the core content for these trainings and help students develop these skills. The program is the latest in a series of resources brought to Central Ohio by Battelle Education’s expertise in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.

“Code.org’s trainings and methods provide a tremendous opportunity for educators who want to prepare students for today’s digital world,” said Aimee Kennedy, Vice-President of Education, STEM Learning and Philanthropy at Battelle. “We’re proud to provide the tools and training teachers need to succeed with these high-quality lessons.”

“Code.org is proud to partner with Battelle Education to expand access to computer science in Central Ohio at a time when the majority of K-12 schools still don’t offer it,” says Hadi Partovi, founder and CEO of Code.org. “By offering Code.org Professional Learning Programs, Battelle Education will give teachers the tools and support they need to introduce foundational 21st-century knowledge into their classrooms and put all students on a path to success in today’s high-tech world.”

Code.org aims to grow the number of schools offering quality computer science. Thirteen Ohio schools have started partnerships with Code.org. Thanks to this partnership, teachers in these schools will have access to additional trainings.

Educators can sign up here to receive updates about the program. Ongoing details will be shared by the Ohio STEM Learning Network. The network is managed by Battelle Education.

Reynoldsburg City Schools has been an early leader in working with Code.org. Reynoldsburg Director of Innovation Courtney Heppner coordinated the district’s implementation of Code.org lessons. “Rather than our students just being consumers of technology, we want them to be creators,” said Heppner. “Computer science gives our students the foundational concepts and skills to create within the digital world.”

Computer science and coding aren’t just popular with educators. Local parents Jackie Galbreath and Junn Som both offered strong support for computer and the Code.org method.

“Computer science is the future of where our students are going to go,” said Galbreath. “Learning about coding gave my daughter a new feeling of power and opportunity.” Galbreath’s daughter participates in the coding club at Reynoldsburg’s Summit Elementary.

“Technology is becoming such an integrated part of our lives and computer science with Code.org is a fun way for kids to learn about technology and computer science,” said Som, who works in information technology and also has a daughter participating in computer science in Reynoldsburg.

About Code.org

Launched in 2013, Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to computer science, and increasing participation by women and underrepresented students of color. Its vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science. Code.org believes computer science should be part of core curriculum, alongside other courses such as biology, chemistry or algebra.

For more information, visit https://www.Code.org.

About Battelle

Every day, the people of Battelle apply science and technology to solving what matters most. At major technology centers and national laboratories around the world, Battelle conducts research and development, designs and manufactures products, and delivers critical services for government and commercial customers. Headquartered in Columbus, Ohio since its founding in 1929, Battelle serves the national security, health and life sciences, and energy and environmental industries. For more information, visit www.battelle.org.

For more information contact Katy Delaney at (614) 424-7208 or delaneyk@battelle.org or T.R. Massey at (614) 424-5544 or masseytr@battelle.org.

About Battelle Education

Battelle Education is a nonprofit subsidiary of Battelle dedicated to innovation in education. Battelle Education brings the same pragmatic, problem-solving approach to education that Battelle brings to the wide world of science and technology challenges. Battelle Education manages a range of successful projects including the Ohio STEM Learning Network, Tennessee STEM Innovation Network, and the national STEMx network.

Leave a Comment